Program Note Podcasts

Get Concert Insights On the Go

The Symphony’s free Program Note Podcast Series highlights a great work being performed each week by the orchestra. Hosted by KDFC’s Rik Malone, the podcasts feature music from Symphony concerts and recordings, and commentary based on our award-winning program notes by James Keller and Michael Steinberg. You can hear them on the way to the concert, on your smart phone or computer. Listen here, and subscribe to get future episodes automatically.

Mahler's Symphony No. 1

Mahler
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Audiences were outraged at Mahler's Symphony No. 1 when it premiered in 1889; they had never heard anything like it. But he himself said "My time will come." And it certainly has.

Rachmaninoff's Symphony No 2

Rachmaninoff
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Sergei Rachmaninoff wrote his Symphony No. 2 while living in Dresden.  At age 33, he was a sought-after conductor and pianist, and had relocated to escape the clamor for his talents.  After completing the work, he declared he would never write another symphony, and waited almost thirty years to do so.

John Cage's The Seasons

John Cage
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John Cage's ballet music The Seasons gurgles, twitters and shimmers with the sounds of nature, and—just like the first day of Spring—it was the first sign of a new type of artistic collaboration.

Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra

Bartók
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After fleeing Hungary during World War II for the United States, Béla Bartók was commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony, to write a piece for orchestra. This resulted in one of Bartók’s best-known works, the Concerto for Orchestra, which contains a parody of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7.

Brahms' Symphony No. 4

Brahms
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Ever the brutal self-critic, Brahms did not write his first symphony until the age of 42.  By the time he wrote his Symphony No. 4 in 1885, he had reached the pinnacle of his orchestral composition—the music he had always wanted to write.

Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture

Beethoven
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Beethoven was, at heart, a man of the theater, and his overture to the play "Coriolan" is one of the most vivid, concise and dramatic character studies ever composed.

Beethoven's Symphony No. 7

Beethoven
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The premiere of Symphony No. 7 was perhaps Beethoven’s greatest rock-star moment.  Buoyed by the excited troops in whose honor the concert was being performed, he “tore his arms with a great vehemence asunder...at the entrance of a forte he jumped in the air” (according to orchestra violinist and composer Louis Spohr). 

Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet

Prokofiev
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Following multiple failed agreements with various ballets (including the Bolshoi, which declared the music impossible to dance to), Sergei Prokofiev reduced what would eventually become his most popular ballet to three orchestral suites. Described by Michael Tilson Thomas as "a great lyrical symphonic epic," the work uses character and emotional motifs to capture the dramatic action in Shakespeare’s classic love story.

Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6

Tchaikovsky
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Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony was not his farewell statement, although at the time of its first performances it may have seemed like one. What it did do was explore new depths of emotion, even for a composer used to wearing his heart on his musical sleeve.

Beethoven's Symphony No. 9

Beethoven
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Often called the greatest piece of music ever written, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 was the last he would ever write. The first symphony to feature a chorus and vocal soloists, Symphony No. 9 also includes the famous Ode to Joy

Brahms' Symphony No. 3

Brahms
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After composing Serenade No. 1, Johannes Brahms waited fifteen years before he wrote another purely orchestral work for large ensemble. Infamous for his harsh self-criticism and haunted by the feeling that he was living in Beethoven’s shadow, Brahms finally broke his symphonic silence at the age of forty-two with the Haydn Variations, a musical experiment with the arrangement of sonic shapes. By the time he composed his Symphony No. 3, ten years later, he had fully realized his true voice as a symphonic master.

Kodály’s Dances of Galánta

Zoltan Kodály
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In his "Dances of Galánta," Zoltan Kodály recreated the sounds of his childhood, and helped preserve the stamping feet of a vanishing culture.

Beethoven's Symphony No. 4

Beethoven
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Despite his family’s financial turmoil, the year 1806 was extraordinarily productive for Beethoven. He wrote many of his great works, including the Razumovsky string quartets, Piano Concerto No. 4, and Symphonies No. 4 and 5. Symphony No. 4—a return to the grace and relative simplicity of his earlier style—is perhaps Beethoven’s least frequently performed symphony. A passage in the middle of the second movement was called “one of the most imaginative passages anywhere in Beethoven” by musicologist Donald Francis Tovey.

Mozart's Symphony No. 36

Mozart
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Mozart wrote his "Linz" Symphony in just four days, but it was his biggest and grandest to that point, and it helped set the stage for the great symphonies of the 19th century.

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