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Jakub Hrůša conducts the San Francisco Symphony, November 8-10

October 15, 2018

         

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE / OCTOBER 15, 2018

 

(High resolution images of Jakub Hrůša, Karen Gomyo, and the San Francisco Symphony are available for download from the San Francisco Symphony’s Online Photo Library)


JAKUB HRŮŠA CONDUCTS THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY, NOVEMBER 8–10 AT DAVIES SYMPHONY HALL

Program includes Borodin’s Symphony No. 2 in B minor, Bartók’s Suite from The Miraculous Mandarin, and Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto No. 1 featuring violinist Karen Gomyo in her SF Symphony subscription debut

 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Conductor Jakub Hrůša returns to lead the San Francisco Symphony (SFS) in a powerful program featuring socially resonant and creatively defiant works by Bartók and Shostakovich, November 8–10 at Davies Symphony Hall. Violinist Karen Gomyo makes her SFS subscription debut with performances of Shostakovich’s sardonic Violin Concerto No. 1, a work that the composer kept hidden for years, faced with the harsh reality of arts censorship during Stalin’s oppressive regime. The concerto was finally premiered by David Oistrakh in 1955, two years after Stalin’s death. Bartók’s beguiling ballet score to The Miraculous Mandarin, also a victim of arts censorship, was completed in 1919 but not produced for more than seven years. The lurid tale of prostitution, fraud, theft, and murder provoked an audience uproar at its 1926 premiere in Cologne and was suspended after a single performance. Completing the program is Borodin’s patriotic Symphony No. 2—full of Slavic character and distinctly Russian melodies, it is the most popular symphony written by any member of the nationalist Mighty Handful and considered one of the strongest and most colorful symphonies of late nineteenth-century nationalism.

[To view the full PDF version of this release, click the link at the top]