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Juraj ValčuhaStéphane Denève, and Itzhak Perlman lead the San Francisco Symphony in three concert programs 

April 6, 2018

 

Contact:
Public Relations
San Francisco Symphony
(415) 503-5474
publicrelations@sfsymphony.org
sfsymphony.org/press


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE / APRIL 6, 2018

 (High resolution images of Juraj Valčuha, Ray Chen, Gautier Capuçon, Stéphane Denève, Itzhak Perlman, and Eugene Izotov are available for download from the San Francisco Symphony’s Online Photo Library. Photo credit L to R: no credit, Julian Hargreaves, Martin Argyroglo, Genevieve Caron, Lisa Marie Mazzucco, Terrence McCarthy)

JURAJ VALČUHA, STÉPHANE DENÈVE, AND ITZHAK PERLMAN

LEAD THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY IN THREE CONCERT PROGRAMS

May 3–5 concerts include Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 3, first SFS performances of Andrew Norman’s Unstuck, and Ray Chen making his SFS debut in Brahms’ Violin Concerto in D major

May 10–12 concerts feature Gautier Capuçon performing Saint-Saens’ Cello Concerto No. 1, as well as Ibert’s Escales, Respighi’s Pines of Rome, and first SFS performances of Guillaume Connesson’s

E chiaro nella valle il fiume appare

On May 17 & 19–20 Itzhak Perlman conducts the SFS in Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings and Elgar’s Enigma Variations, and performs J.S. Bach’s Concerto in C minor for Oboe, Violin and Orchestra with SFS principal oboe Eugene Izotov

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Juraj Valčuha, Stéphane Denève, and Itzhak Perlman return to Davies Symphony Hall in May to lead the San Francisco Symphony (SFS) in three compelling programs. On May 3–5 Juraj Valčuha conducts the SFS in Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 3—based on Prokofiev’s opera The Fiery Angel and considered by the composer to be his best symphony—and the Orchestra’s first performances of American composer Andrew Norman’s Unstuck, a musical depiction of overcoming a creative block, inspired in turn by Kurt Vonnegut’s classic anti-war novel Slaughterhouse-Five. The program also features violinist Ray Chen making his SFS subscription debut in Brahms’ lyrical and virtuosic Violin Concerto in D major. In composing his Violin Concerto, Brahms relied on the counsel of his friend and confidant, and one of the century’s greatest violinists, Joseph Joachim, who is also credited with composing the concerto’s famous first-movement cadenza. San Francisco audiences have a unique opportunity to hear the work performed by Ray Chen on the 1715 “Joachim” Stradivarius violin on loan from the Nippon Music Foundation—the same instrument that Joseph Joachim played when he the premiered the work on January 1, 1879 with Brahms conducting the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig.

[To download the full PDF version of this press release, click the link at the top]