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Herbert Blomstedt and Andrey Boreyko lead the SF Symphony in three concert programs in February  

January 17, 2018

   


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE / JANUARY 17, 2018


 (High resolution images of Herbert Blomstedt, Garrick Ohlsson, Andrey Boreyko, and Vadim Gluzman are available for download from the San Francisco Symphony’s Online Photo Library. Photo credit L to R: U.K. Lengemann, Mark McBeth, Richard de Stoutz, Marco Borggreve)


CONDUCTOR LAUREATE HERBERT BLOMSTEDT LEADS THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY IN TWO CONCERT PROGRAMS, FEBRUARY 810 & 1517

ANDREY BOREYKO CONDUCTS THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY IN THE SEASON’S FINAL CONCERT CELEBRATING BERNSTEIN’S BIRTH CENTENNIAL, FEBRUARY 2224

February 8–10 concerts feature first SFS performances of Stenhammar’s Symphony No. 2 in G minor and Garrick Ohlsson performing Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5; February 15–17 concerts present Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K.550 and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Eroica

February 22–24 concerts include violinist Vadim Gluzman performing Bernstein’s Divertimento and Serenade, and Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 in D minor

SAN FRANCISCO, CAHerbert Blomstedt, Conductor Laureate of the San Francisco Symphony (SFS), returns to Davies Symphony Hall this February to lead the Orchestra in two powerful programs. February 8–10 concerts feature the first SFS performances of Stenhammar’s Symphony No. 2 in G minor, as well as Beethoven’s magnificent Piano Concerto No. 5, Emperor, performed by pianist Garrick Ohlsson. Stenhammar’s Symphony No. 2, completed in 1915, is colored by a Nordic style rooted in Swedish folk music and fuses elements of modal polyphony, symphonic forms, and counterpoint. The work is considered to be the Swedish composer’s symphonic masterpiece, and one of the great Scandinavian symphonies of its time. The following week, February 15–17, Blomstedt leads the SFS in perhaps the most prominent work that came out of Beethoven’s “heroic” phase—his monumental Symphony No. 3, Eroica—and Mozart’s popular Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K.550.   
 

On February 22–24, the San Francisco Symphony, led by guest conductor Andrey Boreyko and joined by violinist Vadim Gluzman, wraps up the Symphony’s season-long celebration of Bernstein’s birth centennial. The concerts include Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5, and feature Gluzman performing Bernstein’s Divertimento and his lyrical Serenade. Bernstein’s lighthearted Divertimento, a series of eight high-spirited miniatures, was composed for the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s centennial in 1980. Bernstein completed the Serenade, which was commissioned by the Koussevitzky Foundation and is dedicated “to the beloved memory of Serge and Natalie Koussevitzky,” in 1954. 

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